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Computer Science (Coding)

Resources for educators about computer science, including the history of computers and coding sites for students.

Featured Books from Your ATA Library

Once upon an Algorithm

How do Hansel and Gretel, Sherlock Holmes, the movie Groundhog Day, Harry Potter, and other familiar stories illustrate the concepts of computing? In Once Upon an Algorithm, Martin Erwig explains computation as something that takes place beyond electronic computers, and computer science as the study of systematic problem solving. Erwig points out that many daily activities involve problem solving. Getting up in the morning, for example: You get up, take a shower, get dressed, eat breakfast. This simple daily routine solves a recurring problem through a series of well-defined steps.

Rev up Robotics

Unlike other robotics books and curriculum, Rev Up Robotics takes a cross-curricular approach, showing educators how to begin incorporating robotics into their content area lessons and in conjunction with other subjects. Teachers will get tips for selecting the robot that works for them and for students, and details on the functions of gears, motors and sensors.

Creating the Coding Generation in Primary Schools

Creating the Coding Generation in Primary Schools sets out the what, why and how of coding. Written by industry innovators and experts, it shows how you can bring the world of coding to your primary school practice. It is packed with a range of inspirational ideas for the cross-curricular teaching of coding, from demystifying algebra in maths, to teaching music, to designing digital storytelling, as well as an insight into the global movement of free coding clubs for young people such as CoderDojo and Girls Learning Code.

Creative Coding

Today, more students start middle school with some foundational knowledge of computer science and coding. This book helps classroom teachers in several core content areas develop activities and projects to encourage computational thinking and coding skills, and to build bridges between those skills and practice. For math, science, English language arts and social studies teachers, the resources in this book provide guidance to start integrating coding into their classes to complement and strengthen existing instruction.

No Fear Coding

Coding and computational thinking are among the skills that will serve students well in the future. Coding goes beyond websites and software; it is an essential component in finding solutions to everyday problems. Computational thinking has many applications beyond the computer lab or math class. It teaches reasoning, creativity and expression, and is an innovative way to demonstrate content knowledge and see mathematical processes in action.No-Fear Coding shows K-5 educators how to bring coding into their curriculum by embedding computational thinking skills into activities for every content area.

CODEBreaker

In Code Breaker, educator Brian Aspinall shares his insights on how to turn curriculum expectations into skills. Students identify problems, develop solutions, and use coding and computational thinking to apply and demonstrate their learning.

Scratch Coding Cards - 75 Cards, Ages 8+

Want to introduce kids to coding in a fun and creative way? With the Scratch Coding Cards, kids learn to code as they create interactive games, stories, music, and animations. Kids can use this colorful 75-card deck to create a variety of interactive programming projects. They ll create their own version of Pong, Write an Interactive Story, Create a Virtual Pet, Play Hide and Seek, and more!

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